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Sight Singing Complete

Sight Singing Complete

Grade Levels: 13
By Maureen Carr and Bruce Benward
Copyright: 2015
Publication Date: March 19, 2014
MHID: 0073526657
ISBN 13: 9780073526652

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New Features

New! A more comprehensive approach to rhythmic studies, including units on 3 against 2, hemiola, 4 against 3, irregular/additive meter, and poly-meter.

New! “Play + Sing” exercises that integrate sight singing, score reading at the keyboard, and rhythmic fluency into a singly activity in all sixteen units spanning Bach to Brubeck.

New! Selections from a wide range of sources, supplementing those retained from the previous edition, including Scottish, Russian, Native American folk songs, and excerpts from operas, symphonies, and choral repertoire.


Key Features

Builds on real repertoire.

A systematic organization.

Diversity of examples.

Sight Singing Complete

Unit 1

A. Rhythm—Simple Meter: One-, Two-, and Three-Beat Values and Duple Division of the Beat

B. Diatonic Models and Melodic Fragments:M2 and m2

C. Melodies by Bruce Benard(Major):M2 and m2

D. Melodies

E. Ensembles and Play + Sing

Unit 2

A. Rhythm—Compound Meter

B. Diatonic Models and Melodic Fragments: P5, P4, M3, m3, M2, and m2

C. Melodies (Major): P5, P4, M3, and m3 within the Tonic Triad and M2 and m2

D. Melodies (Major): P5, P4, M3, and m3 within the Diatonic Scale

E. Ensembles and Play + Sing

Unit 3

A. Rhythm—Simple Meter: Duple Division of the Beat

B. Diatonic Models and Melodic Fragments for Interval Singing: P8, P5, P4, M3, m3, M2, and m2

C. Melodies (Major): P5, P4, M3, m3, M2 and m2 with the Diatonic Scale

D. Melodies (Minor): Mostly by Bruce Benward

E. Ensembles and Play + Sing

Unit 4

A. Rhythm—Simple Meter: Quadruple Subdivision of the Beat

B. Diatonic Models and Melodic Fragments: m10, P8, P5, P4, M3, m3, M2, and m2

C. Melodies (Major and Minor): P5, P4, M3, m3, M2, and m2

D. Melodies (Major and Minor): P5, P4, M3, m3, M2, and m2

E. Ensembles and Play + Sing

Unit 5

A. Rhythm—Simple Meter with the Triplets

B. Diatonic Models and Melodic Fragments: M6 and m6

C. Melodies (Major and Minor): M6 and m6

D. Melodies (Major and Minor): M6 and m6

E. Ensembles and Play + Sing

Unit 6

A. Rhythm—Simple Meter: Further Subdivision of the Beat in Simple Meter

B. Diatonic Models and Melodic Fragments: M6 and m6

C. Melodies (Major and Minor): M6 and m6

D. Melodies (Major and Minor): M6 and m6

E. Ensembles and Play + Sing

Unit 7

A. Rhythm—Hemiola

B. Diatonic Models and Melodic Fragments: M7

C. Melodies (Major and Minor: M6 and m6

D. Melodies (Major and Minor): M6 and m6

E. Ensembles and Play + Sing

Unit 8

A. Rhythm-Simple Meter:The Supertriplet

B. Diatonic Models and Melodic Fragments:m7 and M7

C. Melodies (Major and Minor): m7

D. Melodies (Major and Minor): m7

E. Ensembles and Play + Sing

Unit 9

A. Rhythm—Further Subdivisions of the Beat in Compound Meter and 3 against 2

B. Diatonic Models and Melodic Fragments: A4 and d5

C. Melodies (Major and Minor): Chromatic Alterations, Modulating and Nonmodulating

D. Melodies (Major and Minor): Chromatic Alterations, Modulating and Nonmodulating

E. Ensembles and Play + Sing

Unit 10

A. Rhythm—Changing Meter with Triplets and Aligned and Displaced Hemiolas

B. Diatonic and Chromatic Models and Melodic Fragments: A4 and d5

C. Melodies with Chromatic Alterations

D. Melodies with Chromatic Alterations

E. Ensembles and Play + Sing

Unit 11

A. Rhythm—Subdivisions of the Beat into eight parts

B. Diatonic and Chromatic Models and Melodic Fragments: d7 and A2

C. Melodies with Modal Characteristics

D. More Melodies

E. Ensembles and Play + Sing

Unit 12

A. Rhythm—The Quartolet

B. Chromatic Models and Melodic Fragments: A6 and d3

C. Melodies with Modal Characteristics

D. Melodies

E. Ensembles and Play + Sing

Unit 13

A. Rhythm—Further Subdivisons of the Beat:4 against 3

B. Diatonic and Chromatic Models and Melodic Fragments: d4

C. Melodies Related to Jazz

D. Melodies by Duke Ellington

E. Ensembles and Play + Sing

Unit 14

A. Rhythm—Irregular of Additive Meter

B. Modal Mixtures and Enharmonic Modulation Models and Melodic Fragments

C. Twentieth-Century Cabaret Songs by Arnold Schoenberg

D. Twentieth-Century Songs

E. Ensembles and Play + Sing

Unit 15

A. Rhythm—Changing Meterswith Constant Pulse

B. Whole-Tone, Octatonic, and Atonal Models and Melodic Fragments:All Intervals

C. Twentieth-Century Melodies

D. Vocalises by Honegger and Martinu

E. Ensembles of the Twentieth Century

Unit 16

A. Rhythm—Polymeter

B. Twelve-Tone Models and Melodic Fragments for Interval Study

C and D. Twentieth-Century Melodies

E. Ensembles of the Twentieth Century

About the Author

Maureen Carr

Maureen A. Carr, professor of music theory, is the recipient of the 2005 Penn State Faculty Scholar Medal for Outstanding Achievement in the Arts and Humanities. Carr received her award for her books, Multiple Masks: Neoclassicism in Stravinsky's Dramatic Works on Greek Subjects (University of Nebraska Press, 2002) and Stravinsky's Histoire du soldat (A-R Editions, 2005), which position her as an authority on Stravinsky's musical sketches and one of the leading scholars on the music of Stravinsky.

Her research has been conducted primarily in Switzerland at the Paul Sacher Stiftung in Basel. In addition, she has worked at archives in Winterthur, Lausanne, London and Paris. She has received grants from the Penn State Institute for the Arts and Humanities, the College of Arts and Architecture, the American Association of University Women and Pro Helvetia. She has presented papers at national and international conferences in Belgium, England and Ireland (June, 2005). This summer, she will continue her research in European archives, for a new book addressing the collaboration between Stravinsky and Picasso for Pulcinella. In the Fall semester, she will be in residence at the Penn State Institute for the Arts and Humanities. She will present her research on Pulcinella at the 2005 meeting of the American Musicological Society in Washington, D. C.

Carr has a B. A. from Marywood College, an M.F.A. from Rutgers and a Ph.D. from the University of Wisconsin at Madison. She has served on several national and regional committees related to the field of music theory. In 1995, she received the College of Arts and Architecture's Outstanding Teaching Award. In 1998, she was named a Distinguished Alumna by the University at Madison School of Music and in 2004 received a Marywood University Professional Achievement Award.

Bruce Benward

Bruce Benward has been widely regarded as one of the most gifted music theory pedagogues since his textbooks first appeared in the 1960s, and has exerted a wide influence on the teaching of music theory both through his writings and through the generation of teachers that he taught. He recently retired from the University of Wisconsin at Madison.