Experience History: Interpreting America's Past https://www.mheducation.com/cover-images/Jpeg_250-high/0073407011.jpeg?404URL=https://shop.mheducation.com/mhshopweb/images/no_cover_140.png 13 9780073407012
Experience History: Interpreting America's Past

Experience History: Interpreting America's Past

Grade Levels: 13
By James West Davidson and Brian DeLay and Christine Leigh Heyrman and Mark Lytle and Michael Stoff
Copyright: 2014
Publication Date: September 4, 2013
MHID: 0073407011
ISBN 13: 9780073407012

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New Features

This new edition is powered by Connect History, an easy-to-use learning platform that gives instructors access to engaging assignable and assessable tools, such as primary sources and interactive maps – all of which are tied to learning objectives – that support student success and help bring history to life for students.

Primary Sources, Connect History’s Image Bank allows users easy and quick access to hundreds of additional primary sources which can be downloaded and incorporated into lectures or assessment materials. The Primary Source Primer is a brief, illustrated video tutorial on how to read and analyze a primary source. As students watch, they are prompted at various points in order to confirm understanding.

SmartBook makes study time as productive and efficient as possible. It identifies and closes knowledge gaps through a continually adapting reading experience. This ensures that every minute spent with SmartBook is returned to the student as the most value-added minute possible. The result? More confidence, better grades, and greater success.

Interactive Maps, assignable through Connect and tied to assessment, encourage students’ geographical and historical thinking by demonstrating things like changing boundaries and migration routes, war battles and election results.

Primary Sources - Connect History’s Image Bank allows users easy and quick access to hundreds of additional primary sources which can be downloaded and incorporated into lectures or assessment materials. The Primary Source Primer is a brief, illustrated video tutorial on how to read and analyze a primary source. As students watch, they are prompted at various points in order to confirm understanding.

Critical Missions immerse students as active participants in a series of transformative moments in history. As advisors to key historical figures, they read and analyze sources, interpret maps and timelines, and write recommendations for what do to in a historically critical moment. Later, students learn to think like a historian, conducting a retrospective analysis from a contemporary perspective.


Key Features

Strong environmental coverage Ecological themes--highlighted throughout the text with a sun icon--place American history within a broader environmental framework. Human history is not just the history of people but instead we find ourselves within a natural world that often shapes the course of political and social events in major ways: through climate change, epidemic disease, and the natural or even artificial environments in which we live.

Global and continental perspectives Highlighted with a globe icon, discussions throughout the text place U.S. history in global and continental contexts. 

Historian's Toolbox features in every chapter show students the wide range of evidence that historians use and the questions historians pose when analyzing an artifact. Critical Thinking questions engage students in the process of analysis. Examples include political cartoons, photographs, postcards, ads, art works, comic books, mail-order catalogs, plantation inventories, clocks, calendars, money, furniture, campaign memorabilia, voting equipment, and song lyrics. In Connect, students are asked to analyze historical images from the text.

After the Fact essays take a historical problem and show the detective work that goes into using and interpreting historical evidence. Eight such essays spread throughout the book examine such topics as the relationship of Sally Hemings and Thomas Jefferson, the near extinction of the American bison, the rhetoric of manliness in the Spanish-American war, and the decision to drop the atomic bomb on Japan.

Significant Events timelines at the end of every chapter present key dates and events on a timeline engagingly illustrated with images from the chapter.

Balanced Approach A compelling and lively narrative interweaves political, social, and cultural history. Five historians have collaborated under the direction of historian and professional writer James West Davidson to provide a narrative that offers both scholarly depth and a unified voice.

Dueling Documents in each chapter contrast 2-3 primary sources that offer differing perspectives on key events or questions. Critical thinking questions at the end of the feature guide students in analyzing these sources.

Experience History: Interpreting America's Past

Chapter 1. The First Civilizations of North America

Chapter 2. Old Worlds, New Worlds, 1400-1600

Chapter 3. Colonization and Conflict in the South, 1600-1750

Chapter 4. Colonization and Conflict in the North, 1600-1700

Chapter 5. The Mosaic of Eighteenth-Century America, 1689-1768

Chapter 6. Toward the War for American Independence, 1754-1776

Chapter 7. The American People: The American Revolution, 1775-1783

Chapter 8. Crisis and Constitution, 1776-1789

Chapter 9. The Early Republic, 1789-1824

Chapter 10. The Opening of America, 1815-1850

Chapter 11. The Rise of Democracy, 1824-1840

Chapter 12. The Fires of Perfection, 1820-1850

Chapter 13. The Old South 1820-1860

Chapter 14. Western Expansion and the Rise of the Slavery Issue, 1820-1850

Chapter 15. The Union Broken, 1850-1861

Chapter 16. Total War and the Republic, 1861-1865

Chapter 17. Reconstructing the Union, 1865-1877

Chapter 18. The New South & the Trans-Mississippi West, 1870-1914

Chapter 19. The New Industrial Order, 1870-1914

Chapter 20. The Rise of an Urban Order, 1870-1914

Chapter 21. The Political System under Strain at Home and Abroad, 1877-1900

Chapter 22. The Progressive Era, 1890-1920

Chapter 23. The United States and the Collapse of the Old World Order, 1901-1920

Chapter 24. The New Era, 1920-1929

Chapter 25. The Great Depression and the New Deal, 1929-1939

Chapter 26. America's Rise to Globalism, 1927-1945

Chapter 27. Cold War America 1945-1954

Chapter 28. The Suburban Era 1945-1963

Chapter 29. Civil Rights & Uncivil Liberties 1947-1969

Chapter 30. The Vietnam Era 1963-1975

Chapter 31. The Conservative Challenge, 1976-1992

Chapter 32. The United States in a Global Community, 1989 - Present

About the Author

James West Davidson

James West Davidson received his B.A. from Haverford College and his Ph.D. from Yale University. A historian who has pursued a full-time writing career, he is the author of numerous books, among them After the Fact: The Art of Historical Detection (with Mark H. Lytle), The Logic of Millennial Thought: Eighteenth Century New England, and Great Heart: The History of a Labrador Adventure (with John Rugge). He is co-editor with Michael Stiff of the Oxford New Narratives in American History, in which his most recent book appears: 'They Say': Ida B. Wells and the Reconstruction of Race.

Brian DeLay

Brian DeLay (Ph.D., Harvard) is Assistant Professor of History at the University of California, Berkeley. He specializes in colonial and 19th century U.S. and Mexican history. His scholarship has won awards from the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic, the Western History Association, the Council on Latin American History, the American Society for Ethnohistory, the Pacific Coast Branch of the American Historical Association, and the Society for Historians of American Foreign Relations. He is the author of War of a Thousand Deserts: Indian Raids and the U.S.-Mexican War (Yale, 2008), and is currently at work on a book about the international arms trade and the re-creation of the Americas during the long nineteenth century. He can be reached at delay@berkeley.edu and his website is http://history.berkeley.edu/faculty/DeLay/.

Christine Leigh Heyrman

Christine Leigh Heyrman is Associate Professor of History at the University of Delaware. She received a Ph.D. in American Studies from Yale University and is the author of Commerce and Culture: The Maritime Communities of Colonial Massachusetts, 1690-1750. Her book exploring the evolution of religious culture in the Southern U.S., entitled Southern Cross: The Beginnings of the Bible Belt, was awarded the Bancroft Prize in 1998.

Mark Lytle

Mark H. Lytle received his Ph.D. from Yale University and is Professor of History and Environmental Studies. he has served two years as Mary Ball Washington Professor of American History at University College, Dublin, in Ireland. His publications include The Origins of the Iranian-American Alliance, 1941-1953, After the Fact: The Art of Historical Detection (with James West Davidson), America's Uncivil Wars: The Sixties Era from Elvis to the Fall of Richard Nixon, and, most recently, The Gentle Subversive: Rachel Carson, Silent Spring, and the Rise of the Environmental Movement. He is co-editor of a joint issue of the journals of Diplomatic History and Environmental History dedicated to the field of environmental diplomacy.

Michael Stoff

Michael B. Stoff is Associate Professor of History and Director of the Plan II Honors Program at the University of Texas at Austin. The recipient of a Ph.D. from Yale University, he has been honored many times for his teaching, most recently with election to the Academy of Distinguished Teachers. He is the author of Oil, War, and American Security: The Search for a National Policy on Foreign Oil,1941-1947, co-editor (with Jonathan Fanton and R. Hal Williams) of The Manhattan Project: A Documentary Introduction to the Atomic Age, and series co-editor (with James West Davidson) of the Oxford New Narratives in American History. He is currently working on a narrative on the bombing of Nagasaki.