Applying Anthropology: An Introductory Reader https://www.mheducation.com/cover-images/Jpeg_250-high/0078117046.jpeg?404URL=https://shop.mheducation.com/mhshopweb/images/no_cover_140.png 13 9780078117046
Applying Anthropology: An Introductory Reader

Applying Anthropology: An Introductory Reader

Grade Levels: 13
By Aaron Podolefsky and Peter Brown and Scott Lacy
Copyright: 2012
Publication Date: November 17, 2011
MHID: 0078117046
ISBN 13: 9780078117046

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New Features

New readings - Including topics such as Biological Anthropology, Archaeology, Linguistic Anthropology, and Cultural Anthropology


Key Features

Chart designed to help faculty and students easily locate key themes and topics such as: environment, race, health, gender, and much more (located at the beginning of the text).

Part III for Linguistics Anthropology (formerly included with cultural anthropology) - includes a selection on how children and migration impact the evolution of language and the development of a rare sign language (Reading - From Hoefonum to Heavens).

Readings on the teaching evolution and intelligent design in public schools and anthropology in war zones.

Features careers and research that involve applying anthropology outside the university setting.

Readings complement typical courses in introductory anthropology-the sequence of articles follows the organization of standard anthropology textbooks.

Pedagogical aids: introductions, a list of glossary terms, and guiding questions for each article; a world map that pinpoints the locations of places and peoples discussed in the articles; and, for easy reference, an extensive glossary and index.

Selections dealing with contemporary topics like globalization, HIV/AIDS, racism, cell phones, gender diversity, migration, obesity, intelligent design, and the current wars in the Middle East.

Applying Anthropology: An Introductory Reader

PART I Biological Anthropology

1 Teaching Theories: The Evolution-Creation Controversy- Robert Root-Bernstein and Donald L. McEachron

2 Re-reading Root-Bernstein and McEachron in Cobb County, Georgia: A Year Past and Present- Benjamin Freed

3 Great Mysteries of Human Evolution- Carl Zimmer

4 A New Kind of Ancestor: Ardipithecus Unveiled- Ann Gibbons

5 What are Friends For?- Barbara Smuts

6 Mothers and Others- Sarah Blaffer Hrdy

7 Apes, Hominids, and the Roots of Religion- Barbara King

8 How Race Becomes Biology: Embodiment of Social Inequality- Clarence C. Gravlee

9 Ancient Bodies, Modern Customs, and Our Health- Elizabeth D. Whitaker

10 Ancient Genes and Modern Health- S. Boyd Eaton and Melvin Konner

11 The Tall and the Short of It- Barry Bogin

12 Identifying Victims after a Disaster-Dick Gould

PART II Archaeology

13 Dawn of a New Stone Age in Eye Surgery- Payson D. Sheets

14 Feminine Knowledge and Skills Reconsidered: Women and Flaked Stone Tools- Kathryn Weedman Arthur

15 The Secrets of Ancient Tiwanaku Are Benefiting Today’s Bolivia- Baird Straughan

16 Disease and Death at Dr. Dickson’s Mounds- Alan H. Goodman and George J. Armelagos

17 Uncovering America’s Pyramind Builders- Karen Wright

18 Battle of the Bones- Robson Bonnichsen and Alan L. Schneider

19 The Challenge of Race to American Historical Archaeology- Charles E. Orser Jr.

20 Archaeology and the Vauna Development in Fiji- Andrew Crosby

21 Around the Mall and Beyond- Michael Kernan

22 “Clean Your Plate. There Are People Starving in Africa!”: The Application of Archaeology and Ethnography to America’s Food Loss Issues- Timothy W. Jones

PART III Linguistic Anthropology

23 From Heofonum to Heavens- Yudhiijit Bhattacharjee

23 “To Give up on Words”: Silence in Western Apache Culture- Keith H. Basso

25 Village of the Deaf: In a Bedouin Town, a Language Is Born- Margalit Fox

26 Shifting Norms of Linguistic and Cultural Respect: Hybrid Sociolinguistic Zulu Identities- Stephanie Inge Rudwick

27 Lost in Translation- Lera Boroditsky

28 Talk in the Intimate Relationship: His and Hers- Deborah Tannem

PART IV Cultural Anthropology

CULTURE AND FIELDWORK

29 Body Ritual among the Nacirema- Horace Miner

30 Shakespeare in the Bush-Laura Bohannan

31 Eating Christmas in the Kalahari- Richard Borshay Lee

FAMILY & KINSHIP

32 Our Babies, Ourselves- Meredith F. Small

33 How Many Fathers Are Best for a Child?- Meredith F. Small

34 When Brothers Share a Wife- Melvyn C. Goldstein

35 How Families Work: Love, Labor and Mediated Oppositions in American Domestic Ritual- Mark Auslander

GENDER AND SEXUALITY

36 “Strange Country This”: An Introduction to North American Gender Diversity- Will Roscoe

37 Tricking and Tripping: Fieldwork on Prostitution in the Era of AIDS- Claire E. Sterk

38 Law, Custom, and Crimes against Women: The Problem of Dowry Death in India- John van Wiligen and V.C. Channa

HEALTH, MEDICINE, AND CULTURE

39 Culture and the Evolution of Obesity- Peter J. Brown

40 Pocahontas Goes to the Clinic: Popular Culture as Lingua Franca in a Cultural Borderland- Cheryl Mattingly

41 Culture, Poverty, and HIV Transmission: The Case of Rural Haiti- Paul Farmer

42 Circumcision, Pluralism, and Dilemmas of Cultural Relativism- Corinna A. Kratz

WORK AND BUSINESS

43 Conflict and Confluence in Advertising Meetings- Robert A. Morais

44 Just Another Job?: The Commodification of Domestic Labor- Bridget Anderson

CONFLICT, LAW, AND CULTURE

45 Contemporary Warfare in the New Guinea Highlands- Aaron Podolefsky

46 The Kpelle Moot- James L. Gibbs, Jr.

47 Army Enlists Anthropology in War Zones- David Rohde

48 Moral Fibers of Farmer Cooperatives: Creating Poverty and Wealth with Cotton in Southern Mali- Scott M. Lacy

49 Do Muslim Women Really Need Saving?: Anthropological Reflections on Cultural Relativism and Its Others- Lila Abu-Lughod

50 The Price of Progress- John H. Bodley

Glossary G-1

Index I-1

About the Author

Aaron Podolefsky

Peter Brown

Peter J. Brown teaches at Emory University. He is a professor in the Department of Anthropology, Emory College of Arts and Sciences and also a professor in the Hubert Department of Global Health, Rollins School of Public Health. He serves as the Director of Emory’s Center for Health, Culture and Society. He has co-edited : The Anthropology of Infectious Diseases; Emerging Illnesses and Society: Negotiating the Public Health Agenda; Applying Anthropology (9th edition); and Applying Cultural Anthropology (8th edition). His research primarily deals with sociocultural aspects of malaria and its control, and he serves on a malaria-related Scientific Advisory Committee for the World Health Organization. He has an additional research interest on cultural issues in obesity and its related chronic diseases. Recipient of several teaching awards, he is a director of a new program "Global Health, Culture and Society" at Emory College.

Scott Lacy