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Looseleaf SEYLER, Read, Reason, Write 11e

Looseleaf SEYLER, Read, Reason, Write 11e

11th Edition
By Dorothy Seyler
Copyright: 2015
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ISBN10: 1259871770 | ISBN13: 9781259871771

$100.00

The estimated amount of time this product will be on the market is based on a number of factors, including faculty input to instructional design and the prior revision cycle and updates to academic research-which typically results in a revision cycle ranging from every two to four years for this product. Pricing subject to change at any time.

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CONTENTS

Preface

SECTION 1 CRITICAL READING AND ANALYSIS

Chapter 1 WRITERS AND THEIR SOURCES

  • Reading, Writing, and the Contexts of Argument
  • Responding to Sources
  • Abraham Lincoln, “The Gettysburg Address”
  • The Response to Content
  • The Analytic Response
  • The Evaluation Response
  • The Research Response
  • Deborah Tannen, “Who Does the Talking Here?”
  • Writing Summaries
  • Guidelines for Writing Summaries
  • Active Reading: Use Your Mind!
  • Guidelines for Active Reading
  • Susan Cain, “The Rise of the New Groupthink”
  • Using Paraphrase
  • Acknowledging Sources Informally
  • Referring to People and Sources
  • Joel Achenbach, “The Future Is Now: It’s Heading Right at Us, But We Never See It Coming”
  • Presenting Direct Quotations: A Guide for Form and Style
  • Reasons for Using Quotation Marks
  • A Brief Guide to Quoting
  • For Reading and Analysis
  • Alex Knapp, “Five Leadership Lessons from James. T. Kirk”
  • Suggestions for Discussion and Writing

Chapter 2 RESPONDING CRITICALLY TO SOURCES

  • Traits of the Critical Reader/Thinker
  • Examining the Rhetorical Context of a Source
  • Who Is the Author?
  • What Type—or Genre—of Source Is It?
  • What Kind of Audience Does the Author Anticipate?
  • What Is the Author’s Primary Purpose?
  • What Are the Author’s Sources of Information?
  • Analyzing the Style of a Source
  • Denotative and Connotative Word Choice
  • Tone
  • Level of Diction
  • Sentence Structure
  • Metaphors
  • Organization and Examples
  • Repetition
  • Hyperbole, Understatement, and Irony
  • Quotation Marks, Italics, and Capital Letters
  • Dave Barry, “In a Battle of Wits with Kitchen Appliances, I'm Toast”
  • Writing about Style
  • Understanding Your Purpose and Audience
  • Planning the Essay
  • Drafting the Style Analysis
  • A Checklist for Revision
  • Ellen Goodman, “In Praise of a Snail’s Pace”
  • Student Essay: James Goode, “A Convincing Style”
  • Analyzing Two or More Sources
  • Guidelines for Preparing a Contrast Essay
  • Arthur Bright, “Algerian Hostage Crisis Heightens as Scores Are Reported Dead”
  • Jamie Dettmer, “Hostages Reportedly Dead in Algerian Oil Field Siege”
  • For Reading and Analysis
  • Firoozeh Dumas, "The F Word"
  • Alexandra Petri, “Love to Read, Kids? Your Time Is Almost Up”
  • Suggestions for Discussion and Writing

SECTION 2 THE WORLD OF ARGUMENT

Chapter 3 UNDERSTANDING THE BASICS OF ARGUMENT

STATISTICS IN ARGUMENT

  • Characteristics of Argument
  • Argument Is Conversation with a Goal
  • Argument Takes a Stand on an Arguable Issue
  • Argument Uses Reasons and Evidence
  • Argument Incorporates Values
  • Argument Recognizes a Topic’s Complexity
  • The Shape of Argument: What We Can Learn from Aristotle
  • Ethos (About the Writer/Speaker)
  • Logos (About the Logic of the Argument)
  • Pathos (About Appeals to the Audience)
  • Karios (About the Occasion or Situation)
  • The Language of Argument
  • Facts
  • Inferences
  • Judgments
  • Sam Wang and Sandra Aamodt, “Your Brain Lies to You”
  • The Shape of Argument: What We Can Learn from Toulmin
  • Claims
  • Grounds (or Data or Evidence)
  • Warrants
  • Backing
  • Qualifiers
  • Rebuttals
  • Using Toulmin’s Terms to Analyze Arguments
  • Jeffrey Mateer and Erin Leu, “Cheering Free Speech”
  • William Saletan, “How Can We Ban Insults against Jews but Not Muslims?”
  • Suggestions for Discussion and Writing

Chapter 4 WRITING EFFECTIVE ARGUMENTS

  • Know Your Audience
  • Who Is My Audience?
  • What Will My Audience Know about My Topic?
  • Where Does My Audience Stand on the Issue?
  • How Should I Speak to My Audience?
  • Understand Your Writing Purpose
  • What Type (Genre) of Argument Am I Preparing?
  • What Is My Goal?
  • Will the Rogerian or Conciliatory Approach Work for Me?
  • Move from Topic to Claim to Possible Support
  • Selecting a Topic
  • Drafting a Claim
  • Listing Possible Grounds
  • Listing Grounds for the Other Side or Another Perspective
  • Planning the Approach
  • Draft Your Argument
  • Guidelines for Drafting
  • Revise Your Draft
  • Rewriting
  • Editing
  • A Few Words about Words and Tone
  • Proofreading
  • A Checklist for Revision
  • For Analysis and Debate
  • Darius Rejali, “Five Myths about Torture and Truth”
  • M. Gregg Bloche, “Torture Is Wrong—But It Might Work”
  • Suggestions for Discussion and Writing

Chapter 5 READING, ANALYZING, AND USING VISUALS AND

  • Responding to Visual Arguments
  • Guidelines for Reading Photographs
  • Guidelines for Reading Political Cartoons
  • Guidelines for Reading Advertisements
  • Reading Graphics
  • Understanding How Graphics Differ
  • Guidelines for Reading Graphics
  • The Use of Authority and Statistics
  • Judging Authorities
  • Understanding and Evaluating Sources
  • Guidelines for Evaluating Statistics
  • Guidelines for Evaluating Statistics
  • Writing the Investigative Argument
  • Gathering and Analyzing Evidence
  • Planning and Drafting the Essay
  • Guidelines for Writing an Investigative Argument
  • Analyzing Evidence: The Key to an Effective Argument
  • Preparing Graphics for Your Essay
  • A Checklist for Revision
  • Student Essay: Garrett Berger, “Buying Time”
  • For Reading and Analysis
  • Joe Navarro, “Every Body’s Talking”
  • Suggestions for Discussion and Writing

Chapter 6 LEARNING MORE ABOUT ARGUMENT: INDUCTION,

DEDUCTION, ANALOGY, AND LOGICAL

FALLACIES

  • Induction
  • Deduction
  • “The Declaration of Independence”
  • Analogy
  • Logical Fallacies
  • Causes of Illogic
  • Fallacies That Result from Oversimplifying
  • Fallacies That Result from Avoiding the Real Issue
  • Christian Brahmstedt, “Help Those Who Help, Not Hurt, Themselves”
  • For Reading and Analysis
  • Elizabeth Cady Stanton, “Declaration of Sentiments”
  • Neil de Grasse Tyson, "Things People Say"

SECTION 3 STUDYING SOME ARGUMENTS BY GENRE

Chapter 7 DEFINITION ARGUMENTS

  • Defining as Part of an Argument
  • When Defining Is the Argument
  • Strategies for Developing an Extended Definition
  • Guidelines for Evaluating Definition Arguments
  • Preparing a Definition Argument
  • A Checklist for Revision
  • Student Essay: Laura Mullins, “Paragon or Parasite?”
  • For Analysis and Debate
  • Robin Givhan, “Glamour, That Certain Something”
  • Suggestions for Discussion and Writing

Chapter 8 EVALUATION ARGUMENTS

  • Characteristics of Evaluation Arguments
  • Types of Evaluation Arguments
  • Guidelines for Analyzing an Evaluation Argument
  • Preparing an Evaluation Argument
  • A Checklist for Revision
  • Student Review: Ian Habel, “Winchester’s Alchemy: Two
  • Men and a Book”
  • Evaluating an Argument: The Rebuttal or Refutation Essay
  • Guidelines for Preparing a Refutation or Rebuttal Argument
  • Steven Pinker, “Mind Over Mass Media”
  • For Analysis and Debate
  • Thomas Sowell, “Christmas-Tree Totalitarians”
  • Suggestions for Discussion and Writing

Chapter 9 THE POSITION PAPER: CLAIMS OF VALUE

  • Characteristics of the Position Paper
  • Guidelines for Analyzing a Claim of Value
  • Preparing a Position Paper
  • A Checklist for Revision
  • Student Essay: Chris Brown, “Examining the Issue of Gun Control”
  • David Pogue, “To Track My Thief”
  • Gregory M. Kennedy SJ, “Trash Talk: Reflections on Our Throwaway Society”
  • Suggestions for Discussion and Writing

Chapter 10 ARGUMENTS ABOUT CAUSE

  • Characteristics of Causal Arguments
  • An Example of Causal Complexity: Lincoln’s Election and the Start of the Civil War
  • Mill’s Methods for Investigating Causes
  • Guidelines for Analyzing Causal Arguments
  • Preparing a Causal Argument
  • A Checklist for Revision
  • For Analysis and Debate
  • Emily Matchar, “Why Your Office Needs More Bratty Millennials”
  • Caroline Simard, “ ‘Daring to Discuss Women in Science’: A Response to John Tierney”

Chapter 11 PRESENTING PROPOSALS: THE PROBLEM/SOLUTION

  • Characteristics of Problem/Solution Arguments
  • Guidelines for Analyzing Problem/Solution Arguments
  • Priya Natarajan, “Want More Scientists? Turn Grade Schools into Laboratories”
  • Preparing a Problem/Solution Argument
  • A Checklist for Revision
  • For Analysis and Debate
  • Peter Edelman, “Poverty in America: Why Can’t We End It”
  • Jonathan Swift, "A Modest Proposal"
  • Suggestions for Discussion and Writing

Chapter 12 LOCATING, EVALUATING, AND PREPARING TO USE SOURCES

  • Selecting a Good Topic
  • What Type of Paper Am I Preparing?
  • Who Is My Audience?
  • How Can I Select a Good Topic?
  • What Kinds of Topics Should I Avoid?
  • Writing a Tentative Claim or Research Proposal
  • Preparing a Working Bibliography
  • Basic Form for Books
  • Basic Form for Articles
  • Locating Sources
  • The Book Catalog
  • The Reference Collection
  • Electronic Databases
  • Guidelines for Using Online Databases
  • The Internet
  • Guidelines for Searching the Web
  • Field Research
  • Evaluating Sources, Maintaining Credibility
  • Federal, State, and Local Government Documents
  • Correspondence
  • Interviews
  • Lectures
  • Films, DVDs, Television
  • Surveys, Questionnaires, and Original Research
  • Evaluating Sources, Maintaining Credibility
  • Guidelines for Evaluating Sources
  • Preparing an Annotated Bibliography

Chapter 13 WRITING THE RESEARCHED ESSAY

  • Guidelines for Studying Sources
  • Avoiding Plagiarism
  • What Is Common Knowledge?
  • Using Signal Phrases to Avoid Confusion
  • Guidelines for Appropriately Using Sources
  • Organizing the Paper
  • Drafting the Essay
  • Plan Your Time
  • Handle In-Text Documentation as You Draft
  • Choose an Appropriate Writing Style
  • Write Effective Beginnings
  • Avoid Ineffective Openings
  • Compose Solid, Unified Paragraphs
  • Write Effective Conclusions
  • Avoid Ineffective Conclusions
  • Choose an Effective Title
  • Revising the Paper: A Checklist
  • Rewriting
  • Editing
  • Proofreading
  • The Completed Paper
  • Sample Student Essay in MLA Style: David Donaldson, “Tell Us What You Really Are: The Debate over Labeling Genetically Modified Food”

Chapter 14 FORMAL DOCUMENTATION: MLA STYLE, APA STYLE

  • Guidelines for Using Parenthetical Documentation
  • The Simplest Patterns of Parenthetical Documentation
  • Placement of Parenthetical Documentation
  • Parenthetical Citations of Complex Sources
  • Preparing MLA Citations for a Works Cited List
  • Forms for Books: Citing the Complete Book
  • Forms for Books: Citing Part of a Book
  • Forms for Periodicals: Articles in Journals and Magazines Accessed in Print
  • Forms for Periodicals: Articles in Newspapers Accessed in Print
  • Forms for Web Sources
  • Forms for Other Print and Nonprint Sources
  • Author/Year or APA Style
  • APA Style: In-Text Citations
  • APA Style: Preparing a List of References
  • Form for Books
  • Form for Articles
  • Form for Electronic Sources
  • Sample Student Essay in APA Style: Carissa Ervine, “The Relationship Between Depression and Marital Status”

SECTION 5 A COLLECTION OF READINGS

Chapter 15 THE MEDIA: IMAGE AND REALITY

  • Derrick Speight, “Of Losers and Moles: You Think Reality TV Just Writes Itself?”
  • Ann Hornaday, “Zero Dark Thirty and the New Reality of Reported Filmmaking”
  • Katherine Ellison, “What’s Up, Doc? A Bloody Outrage, That's What"
  • Student Essay: Sienna Walker, “Big Pun’s Prophesy”
  • Frank Luntz, “Words We Remember”

Chapter 16 THE INTERNET AND SOCIAL MEDIA: THEIR IMPACT ON OUR LIVES

  • Peggy Orenstein, “I Tweet, Therefore I Am”
  • Susan B. Crawford, “The New Digital Divide”
  • Daniel M. Wegner, “Do Not Fear the Cybermind”
  • Eugeny Morozov, “The Death of the Cyberflâneur”
  • Lori B. Andrews, “Facebook Is Using You”

Chapter 17 MARRIAGE AND GENDER ISSUES: THE DEBATES CONTINUE

  • Michael Kinsley, “Abolish Marriage”
  • Andrew Sullivan, “My Big Fat Straight Wedding”
  • Stephanie Coontz, “The Myth of Male Decline”
  • Meg Jay, “The Downside of Living Together”
  • Kathleen Parker, “Un-hitching the Middle Class”
  • Gloria Steinem, “Supremacy Crimes”

Chapter 18 SPORTS TALK—SPORTS BATTLES

  • John Feinstein, “The Lesson of Penn State”
  • Donald Yee, "Show Them the Money"
  • Sally Jenkins, “Rather Than Pay Athletes, Show Them Respect”
  • Ruth Marcus, "Privilege Unchecked in the U-Va. Case?"
  • Megan Greenwell, “Where Have All the Good Coaches Gone?”
  • Jonathan Vaughters, “How To Get Doping Out of Sports”
  • Branden Allenby, “After Armstrong’s Fall, the Case for Performance Enhancement”

Chapter 19 EDUCATION IN AMERICA: PROBLEMS AT ALL LEVELS

  • Richard Kalenberg, "5 Myths about Who Gets into College"
  • Naomi Schaefer Riley, “What’s a College Education Really Worth? Not Enough”
  • Derek Thompson, “What’s More Expensive Than College? Not Going to College”
  • Danielle Allen, “Helping Students Find Their Place in the World”
  • Howard Gardner, “Why Kids Cheat at Harvard”
  • George Will, “The Closed American Mind”

Chapter 20 THE ENVIRONMENT: HOW DO WE SUSTAIN IT?

  • Michael Novacek, “The Sixth Extinction: It Happened to Him. It’s Happening to You.”
  • Daniel T. Willingham, “Trust Me, I’m a Scientist”
  • James R. Lee, “Global Warming Is Just the Tip of the Iceberg”
  • Art Carden, “On Climate Change, Government Is Not the Answer”
  • Kristen Sheeran and Mindy Lubber, “The Cost of Climate Inaction”

Chapter 21 LAWS AND RIGHTS: GUN CONTROL AND IMMIGRATIONDEBATES

  • Katha Pollitt, “Gun Control? Dream On”
  • Petula Dvorak, “We Can’t Afford the True Cost of Gun Crime”
  • Jay Dickey and Mark Rosenberg, “ ‘Senseless’ Is Not Studying Gun Violence”
  • Amy Chua, “Immigrate, Assimilate”
  • Roberto Suro, “Legal, Illegal”
  • Patricia B. Strait, “When Societies Collide: Part Three: Finding the Best Fit Immigration Model”

Chapter 22 AMERICA: PAST, PRESENT, FUTURE

  • Abraham Lincoln, “Second Inaugural Address”
  • Zainab Chaudary, “Your Most Powerful Currency: Your Vote”
  • Thomas L. Friedman, “Do You Want the Good News First?”
  • Fareed Zakaria, “The Emerging America”
  • Colbert I. King, “We Still Aren’t Good Enough”
  • Kwame Anthony Appiah, “How the Future Will Judge Us”
  • Barack H. Obama, “We Made Ourselves Anew, and Vowed to Move Forward Together”

APPENDIX: UNDERSTANDING LITERATURE

  • Getting the Facts: Active Reading, Summary, and Paraphrase
  • Paul Lawrence Dunbar, "Promise"
  • Kate Chopin, "The Story of an Hour"
  • Summary of "The Story of an Hour"
  • William Shakespeare, "Sonnet 116"
  • Paraphrase of "Sonnet 116"
  • Seeing Connection: Analysis
  • Analysis of Narrative Structure
  • Analysis of Character
  • Analysis of Elements of Style and Tone
  • Drawing Conclusions: Interpretation
  • Writing about Literature
  • Andrew Marvell, "To His Coy Mistress"
  • Christopher Marlowe, "The Passionate Shepherd to His Love"
  • Sir Walter Raleigh, "The Nymph's Reply to the Shepherd"
  • A.E. Housman, "Is My Team Ploughing"
  • Amy Lowell, "Taxi"
  • Ursula K. Le Guin, "The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas"
  • Susan Glaspell, "Trifles"
  • Sample Student Literary Analysis: Alan Peterson “Faulkner’s Realistic Initiation Theme”
  • Suggestions for Discussion and Writing